Author Topic: Quit Smoking  (Read 51 times)

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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2016, 11:31:44 am »
Staying Smoke-Free
No cigarette is worth your health or the health of the people around you.

If youíve quit within the past six months, youíre probably still developing this new "habit". After all, it took time to learn to smoke, so it will take some time to unlearn.

Remind yourself how far youíve come and how hard it was to get there Ė think about what it would be like to have to go through that again.

Remind yourself of your reasons for quitting and all that you would be giving up.

Remind yourself that this craving is temporary, and if you choose to wait it out, you can continue to enjoy the benefits of being a non-smoker.

Saying goodbye to your old friend tobacco can be depressing. But feeling sad is a good sign. It means you are letting your feelings out and no longer using cigarettes to control your mood. Give tobacco a proper funeral.

Moving Past Setbacks
If youíve slipped up in your quitting process, thereís good news: you donít need to start from scratch.

If it happened recently (within the last 24 hours) itís a small setback and nothing more. Donít be too hard on yourself Ė you need to stay positive. Decide to get back on track now. Donít let all of your efforts go to waste. Remember that youíve already reduced your physical dependence on nicotine (particularly if youíve gone a week or more without smoking) Ė the worst is over.

If it happened a while ago: Consider it part of the quitting process. Use this as an opportunity for learning. Youíre in a better position to quit now then you were the last time you tried. Everyone who slips up can learn from it.

Identify the triggers: Ask yourself: What made me smoke? How did it happen and why?


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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2016, 11:33:16 am »
the worst offender is the gutkha it leads to oral cancer and hyperplasia .it is the cheapest substitute to asmoke cos u dont have to light it.. and can be consumed in a no smaking zone.

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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2016, 11:33:50 am »
some additional info.......it takes about 40 breaths after the ciggerate smoke to flush out the smoke you have inhaled..thats about two mts of your life..think about it


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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #33 on: December 14, 2016, 11:34:38 am »
Cigarettes and smokeless tobacco kill hundreds of thousands of Americans every year. You know those rubber bracelets that were created to bring attention to different causes? The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids created a red one with the number 1,200 on it. Why 1,200? That's the number of people who die each day due to smoking.

The nicotine and other poisonous chemicals in tobacco cause lots of diseases, like heart problems and some kinds of cancer. If you smoke, you hurt your lungs and heart each time you light up. It also can make it more difficult for blood to move around in the body, so smokers may feel tired and cranky. The longer you smoke, the worse the damage becomes.

Tobacco contains nicotine, a chemical that causes a tingly or good feeling - but that feeling only lasts for a little while. Nicotine is also addictive. That means that if you start to use nicotine, your body and mind will become so used to it that you'll need to have it just to feel OK


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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #34 on: December 14, 2016, 11:35:11 am »
Smoking doesn't make girls skinny but does make boys short


Busting a myth around smoking a new study has revealed that while smoking doesn't make girls skinny, it does hinder growth in their teenage male counterparts.

Canadian researchers examined 1,250 youngsters from age 12 to17 and compared smokers to the non-smokers every three months.

The findings revealed that teenage girls whom smoke do not loose weight and had similar height and body mass index (BMI).

The study also found that teenage boys were likely to be shorter by 2.54 centimetres than those who do not smoke.

"Teenage girls who are unhappy about their weight often take up smoking because they think it will make them thinner," Sydney Morning Herald quoted Quit executive director Fiona Sharkie, as saying.

"However, this study shows smoking has no impact on weight loss or weight control for young women," she added.

Sharkie believes that the findings would discourage young girls and boys from smoking.

"Sometimes we forget that boys are just as concerned about their body image. But I think these findings send a message to teenagers of both sexes that smoking has no physical benefits," she said.


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Re: SMOKING
« Reply #35 on: December 14, 2016, 11:38:27 am »
according to some stats....tragically every month in the UK 1,150 people die prematurely as a result of hip fractures due to the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis.

Many of these breaks could be avoided if people knew more about keeping their bones strong from an early age.....which they do not do. people please we need to do something bout this as this evil is eating up our generation.....

I personally can't do much but came across this quiz on the timeswellness.com website. people kindly go through and realize for youself as this is killing us......


June is National Osteoporosis Awareness month, so what better time to bone up on your risk and how to keep yours healthy with my quiz...

(1) Are you...

a) Male
b) Female

Why? Women get the short straw - after the age of 50 osteoporosis affects one in two compared with one in five men. As we age, bones gradually thin but it's worse in women because we suffer a sharp drop in the 'female' hormone oestrogen, which helps protect bones, at menopause. Our bones are also smaller.

(2) How old are you?

a) Under 28
b) 28 to 39
c) 40-51
d) 52-plus

Why? Your body's bone-building capacity peaks in your early to mid 20s so following a healthy diet and lifestyle then will give you the best chance of having strong bones for life. You can still build bone afterwards but at nowhere near the same rate.

(3) Do you have any close relatives with the disease?

a) Grandparent, aunt or uncle
b) Parent
c) No

Why? The disease runs in families and the closer the relative, the higher your risk. If one of your parents has it, your risk could be 80 per cent.

(4) Have you ever been underweight?

a) Yes, for several years
b) Yes, but only for a short time
c) No, never

Why? Being underweight for some time, especially due to an eating disorder like anorexia, probably means you've missed out on vital bone nutrients like calcium and vitamin D. Anorexics are also low on oestrogen, which in turn affects bone strength.

(5) Have you ever...

a) Missed periods for six months or longer (apart from in pregnancy), or had a hysterectomy or menopause before the age of 45? Yes/No
b) If you're a man, have you been diagnosed with low levels of testosterone? Yes/No

Why? Missed periods and a premature menopause or hysterectomy, especially where the ovaries are removed, all result in low levels of bone-protecting oestrogen. Similarly testosterone helps protect bones in men so low levels will put you at risk.

(6) What exercise do you do?

a) Running, aerobics, brisk walking or dancing and weights
b) Swimming, cycling or yoga
c) Reaching for the remote control

Why? The most effective exercises for bones involve impact - running, aerobics and walking - and resistance, such as weight-lifting. Women who walk for six hours a week have around half the risk of those who walk for less than an hour a week. But watch out if you're a marathon runner - excessive exercise can actually reduce levels of bone-protecting hormones. Non-impact exercise such as swimming and yoga don't affect bones but can improve strength and balance, helping to prevent falls.

(7) How often do you eat calcium-rich foods?
These include milk, yoghurt, cheese, eggs, soya milk with added calcium, canned fish with salmon, fortified cereals, green leafy veg like broccoli, and nuts.

a) Three times a day
b) A couple of times a week or less
c) Hardly ever

Why? Calcium is the most important nutrient for bones, with dairy products the bes
t source - aim for three portions a day but choose low-fat options where possible. To absorb calcium, you also need vitamin D. Besides a small amount of sunlight, good sources include oily fish like sardines, herring and mackerel, eggs, fortified cereals and fortified spreads. But avoid too much salt, caffeine and fizzy drinks, which can deplete the body's calcium stores.

(Do you smoke?
a) Yes
b) I've given up
c) Never

Why? Studies show smokers have a significantly higher risk of fractures than non-smokers - the more you smoke and the longer you've smoked for, the higher your risk. Heavy smoking can also bring on the menopause up to five years earlier, which further increases risk.

(9) How much do you drink?

a) I dread to think
b) Regularly more than the official recommended daily limit (three units* for a woman, four for a man)
c) The odd drink at weekends

Why? The odd drink won't do you any harm but too much booze suppresses the bone-building cells. Stick to the official recommended limit, with a couple of alcohol-free days a week. / A unit is a single pub measure of spirits, a half-pint of standard strength beer, lager or cider or half a small (175ml) glass of wine.

(10) Have you had any of the following?

a) Aches and pains in bones and joints
b) Bone fractures
c) You've shrunk with age
d) An increasingly bent posture

Why? You can have osteoporosis for years until you finally break a bone. However signs may include aching bones and joints, including severe backache, especially after the menopause. If untreated, bones can become so brittle that you can fracture a rib by coughing. When bones in the spine become fractured, they have difficulty supporting your weight, so you get a bent posture.

(11) Do any of these apply to you?

a) Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
b) An overactive thyroid
c) Crohn's or coeliac disease
d) Having taken high-dose corticosteroid tablets long-term

Why? Both Crohn's and coeliac disease interfere with your ability to absorb nutrients while RA and an overactive thyroid affect hormones. Long-term, high-dose corticosteroids, often used for arthritis and asthma, are known to thin bones.

How did you score?

1) a) 0 b)+2

2) a)-2 b) 0 c)+1 d)+2

3) a)+2 b)+3 c) 0

4) a)+2 b)+1 c)0

5) Yes: +2 No: 0

6) a)-2 b)-1 c)+2

7) a)-3 b)-2 c)+2

a)+2 b)+1 c)0

9) a)+2 b)+1 c)0

10) a)+1 b)+2 c)+2 d)+2

11) a)+2 b)+2 c)+2 d)+2

The higher your score, the greater your risk.

-6 to +4 - Congratulations. Your bones must be like steel. Keep up the good work.

4 to 10 - Your risk isn't huge but a few bone-boosting lifestyle changes could lower it significantly.

11+ - Watch out, you may be at risk. Make changes now and if you have any of the possible symptoms listed, see your GP who can send you for a scan if necessary. Treatment involves medication, diet, supplements and physiotherapy.


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Re: Quit Smoking
« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2016, 11:42:56 am »
This week i heard a nice suggestion from someone who wants to quit smoking.

He bought a book....

Each time he wants to light a cigarette, he reads a page in the book instead.
Don't know if it was successful, but the idea is unique 


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Re: Quit Smoking
« Reply #39 on: December 14, 2016, 11:45:09 am »
Smoking is a practice in which a substance, most commonly tobacco, is burned and the smoke is tasted or inhaled. This is primarily practised as a route of administration for recreational drug use, as combustion releases the active substances in drugs such as nicotine and makes them available for absorption through the lungs. It can also be done as a part of rituals, to induce trances and spiritual enlightenment.

The most common method of smoking today is through cigarettes, primarily industrially manufactured but also hand-rolled from loose tobacco and rolling paper. Other smoking implements include pipes, cigars, bidis, hookahs, vaporizers, and bongs. It has been suggested that smoking-related disease kills one half of all long term smokers but these diseases may also be contracted by non-smokers. A 2007 report states that, each year, about 4.9 million people worldwide die as a result of smoking.

Smoking is one of the most common forms of recreational drug use. Tobacco smoking is today by far the most popular form of smoking and is practiced by over one billion people in the majority of all human societies. Less common drugs for smoking include cannabis and opium. Some of the substances are classified as hard narcotics, like heroin, but the use of these is very limited as they are often not commercially available.

The history of smoking can be dated to as early as 5000 BC, and has been recorded in many different cultures across the world. Early smoking evolved in association with religious ceremonies; as offerings to deities, in cleansing rituals or to allow shamans and priests to alter their minds for purposes of divination or spiritual enlightenment. After the European exploration and conquest of the Americans, the practice of smoking tobacco quickly spread to the rest of the world. In regions like India and Subsaharan Africa, it merged with existing practices of smoking (mostly of cannabis). In Europe, it introduced a new type of social activity and a form of drug intake which previously had been unknown. smoking is injurious to health.


 

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